D&D Players Can Now Create Fairy, Owlfolk & Rabbitfolk Characters


Dungeons & Dragons players can now create Fairy, Hobgoblin, Owlfolk, and Rabbitfolk characters, thanks to new playtest material from Unearthed Arcana.

The latest Unearthed Arcana article for Dungeons & Dragons has added new playable races native to the Feywild, including Fairy, Hobgoblin of the Feywild, Owlfolk, and Rabbitfolk. D&D lets players create characters from a number of different fictional races, some of which are fantasy staples, like the Minotaurs of Theros. There are new D&D races added in many of the rulebooks for 5E, in order to let players create the most fantastical characters possible.

The standard selection of D&D races used to look like a casting call from The Lord of the Rings, but the series gradually incorporated more outlandish races in the Player’s Handbook, like the Dragonborn and Tiefling. As time went on in each edition’s life cycle, each edition added more and more playable races, and the new races of D&D 5e are no exception. The hard limit on stat upgrades and the fact that a lot of games use the standard dice array for character creation means the races are pretty balanced, so DMs generally don’t have to worry about new additions to the lore ruining their campaign.

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Related: All 7 Major D&D Rule Changes In Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything

The official D&D website has a series of articles called Unearthed Arcana, which include playtesting material that is being refined for publication. The previous article added Dhampirs and Frankenstein monsters to D&D, and the latest Unearthed Arcana has added four mystical races from the Feywild, including the highly-anticipated D&D 5E Rabbitfolk.

D&D’s New Feywild Races: Fairies, Hobgoblins, Owlfolk, & Rabbitfolk

The new Feywild races aren’t classified as Custom Lineages, but players can still move their stat bonus points around how they choose. The first race is Fairy, which are small creatures with the ability to fly. Fairies can cast Druidcraft and Faerie Fire at will, as well as squeeze through 1-inch narrow spaces. Hobgoblins of the Feywild have the Fey Ancestry trait of other races, as well as a selection of bonuses they can grant to other characters through the Help action. Owlfolk share ancestry with giant owls, giving them fluffy wings on their backs. Owlfolk can also innately sense magic and are dexterous fliers. The D&D 5E Rabbitfolk have long feet and fur, the former of which allows them to perform mighty leaps so that they can escape foes.

The Final Versions Of The Unearthed Arcana Races

The new races in D&D 5E are later printed in official books. The Fairy and the Rabbitfolk later appeared in The Wild Beyond the Witchlight, where the Rabbitfolk were renamed the Harengon. The Owlfolk later appeared in Strixhaven: A Curriculum of Chaos, where they were renamed the Owlin. The people who want to use the final versions of these races should check out these books, especially if they want to use their characters in official D&D Adventurers League events. The Hobgoblins of the Feywild have yet to appear in a printed supplement, but they will likely be part of the upcoming Mordenkainen Presents: Multiverse of Monsters.

The new rules for D&D races introduced in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything have opened the door for all kinds of interesting character options like these. The D&D Rabbitfolk are some of the most interesting additions to the lore of the game. This raises the question of what other new races are coming to D&D 5E in the future, as the Dungeons & Dragons multiverse continues to expand?

Next: D&D: Why Wagons Were Once The Best Weapons In The Game

Source: Unearthed Arcana

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Scott Baird
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Scott has been writing for Screen Rant since 2016 and regularly contributes to The Gamer. He has previously written articles and video scripts for websites like Cracked, Dorkly, Topless Robot, and TopTenz.
A graduate of Edge Hill University in the UK, Scott started out as a film student before moving into journalism. It turned out that wasting a childhood playing video games, reading comic books, and watching movies could be used for finding employment, regardless of what any career advisor might tell you. Scott specializes in gaming and has loved the medium since the early ‘90s when his first console was a ZX Spectrum that used to take 40 minutes to load a game from a tape cassette player to a black and white TV set. Scott now writes game reviews for Screen Rant and The Gamer, as well as news reports, opinion pieces, and game guides. He can be contacted on LinkedIn.

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